Review – Speedball Super Black Ink

Let’s get to inks. If you’re drawing you might want to try out some India inks. I’ve already taken a look at Higgins India inks, but today I’ll be looking at Speedball Super Black. The ink comes in a plastic half-cone container, that is fine for dipping as it is very wide. It is very full though and can be easily spilled at first, so be careful. The cap has a foil lining that isn’t very good and ink gets on the rim and underneath it constantly, so be careful when opening and closing as there may be ink where it isn’t supposed to be.

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Now on to the ink itself. It is black, and when I say black I mean black. It has virtually no greying even when applied in the finest or broadest of nibs or brushes. It goes on black, and it dries black. Though it is a warm black with a hint of yellow brown when applied very thin. It does dry fairly quickly, though not the fastest, and it doesn’t feather on any paper I’ve used, even in large amounts. It doesn’t bleed through the page, but it does have some show through and page buckling in larger dollops, so it should only be applied in one coat. It is quite water-proof as in it doesn’t even move when water is applied to it, though that is because it contains shellac which can clog up pens and brushes if not washed out properly. They recommend ammonia for that but soapy water applied right after use should do the trick if nothing else. It can also be diluted for washes etc, but because it is heavily pigmented this is not the optimal ink for the purpose as it could go bad quickly.

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Overall if you want a BLACK drawing ink and can handle the problems pigmented ink presents this is a fairly cheap ink that may just be exactly what you’re looking for.

 

 

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Comparison – Wite Out Vs. Liquid Paper

Sometimes you make mistakes, and sometimes those mistakes need to be corrected. There are a few ways to do this, and a few brands of correction fluids to buy. Today we’ll be comparing Liquid Paper and Wite Out.

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What do they have in common? They both have similar size bottles (~20ml) and a stick with a sponge-wedge applicator. They are about the same size in application. Those are the only cosmetic similarities. The bottles themselves are very different. The Liquid Paper one is a bit larger with grooves on the side for grippyness, while Wite Out is just in a slim, standard-looking bottle. The Liquid Paper bottle has ridges on the cap that are supposed to make it easy to open, but instead they are slippery and difficult. They also get in the way when applying. The ridges on the Wite Out are much easier and less intrusive.

But now on to the substance itself. And there is no noticeable difference in the application process, as they have about the same viscosity and go on smooth. The brush on the liquid paper feels a bit stiffer. When dry the best I can say is Wite Out is a warm white, and Liquid Paper is a cool white. The are both undeniably white, but neither are true white. You couldn’t say they have tints, they are just warm and cool. After drying the Wite Out is easier to write on, so that is the only other consideration.

It really depends on what paper you have when using these, warm or cool paper. Yellowish will prefer warm. And though Wite Out is easier afterwards, it isn’t too much easier. So it comes down to price if neither of those things matter, as I can say that they both work quite well at what they’re designed for.

Review – Signo Angelic White

Some colors of pens are rare, and white even more so. So if you need to highlight something in your art or maybe need a white-out pen that isn’t a white out pen you can try the Uni-ball Signo Angelic white gel pen.

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Starting with the pen itself: the barrel is octagonal near the back and becomes a weird grip shape near the front, though it is quite comfortable. The cap has a plastic clip that works I guess and securely clicks into place on both the front and back of the pen. A metal cone holds the tip and cartridge in place and can be easily unscrewed for refilling.

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The ink is white. Though not as white as one might hope, being a gel ink it is slightly transparent, and on darker colors would require several coats to cover completely. That being said it highlights very well and is very visible on colored paper, though it looks a bit grey on black paper. The ball is also very fine, leading to a line that can be very faint sometimes.

So overall it is good at highlighting and some writing, but if you’re looking for a pen that can precisely cover marks and don’t have the patience to use multiple coats you might not want to look at the Uniball Signo Angelic White.